Eat Well, Move More











{June 15, 2012}   The ugly truth…the numbers

This is not the before photo I intended to put up, but this is me.  I am still working on my “good-bye” photos to give better views of the “shape” that I’m in, so that I can see the progress when I take new photographs in a couple of months.

Some may say, “You don’t look so bad. You don’t need to lose weight. What are you talking about?”   The package can be deceiving. Fashion can help us hide our flaws. It’s what lies underneath that holds the real story.

This is a photo taken very recently by my daughter.  What you may or may not see is my bulging belly, my oversized hips, flabby arms. And you certainly do not the see the size of my a…, ahem, behind.  You won’t see the high blood pressure or other health issues. You probably don’t see the unhappiness deep down inside, because I am so disappointed in myself for not taking better care of myself. You don’t see the frustration when I glance in a mirror or the private humiliation while trying on jeans in the dressing room.  Perhaps you can relate?

At the time of this photograph, my weight was somewhere around 168 pounds.  This would not be a bad weight if I were closer to say 5 foot 9 inches.  I am not anywhere near 5 foot 9 inches. I am actually a petite 5 foot 2 inches, who earlier in her life had a slender frame.  Carrying this excess weight (about 4o pounds excess) is not comfortable nor healthy.  My BMI is over 30, which falls into the “obese” category. How humiliating is that?

My measurements are as follows:

  • Bust  39 inches
  • Chest 33 inches
  • Waist 37 inches
  • Hips 45 inches
  • Thighs 23 1/2 inches
  • Upper Arms 13 inches

Our bodies are not perfectly symmetrical. My right leg and arm measure slightly larger than my left, so I averaged those numbers for simplicity.  I still fall into the “pear shape” category, but I do have quite the belly these days. I didn’t have a “belly” until recent years, and this concerns me.  It’s the shape of my body and amount of fat that I carry that I want to change.

This is my starting point.

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{May 14, 2012}   Love Don’t Cost A Thing

The title is poor grammar, yes. And it’s more than a teen movie title from the early ’90’s or  a Jennifer Lopez song.

I spent a few hours this weekend sorting out all of the fitness and exercise stuff that I own.  The above picture is just a sampling of the “fitness” stuff in my house. I was trying to figure out what I need to take the next step in my plan to get healthy and fit.

I wonder how many of us do this? (C’mon, raise your hand. You know you’ve done at least one…)

  • See an infomercial for a new DVD exercise program and put it on our wish list, or even buy it.
  • Buy magazine after magazine with eye-catching headlines promising to show you how to get “flat abs” or lose 20 pounds by summer.
  • Shop yard sales or Craigslist for a weight bench or treadmill.
  • See an advertisement for this month’s special on a gym membership and look in the checkbook to see if you can budget it in
  • Make a shopping list of what gadgets or tools you need to start your fitness or weight loss program

Over the years, I have collected several “fitness guru” books, a few sets of exercise DVD’s and magazines. I’ve owned weight benches, dumbbells, elastic bands, balance balls, and other equipment. In the past, I’ve had gym memberships or exercise class punch cards that often went unused.  Up until a few weeks ago, I had a wish list for the perfect “as seen on TV” exercise program, as if it would motivate me to follow through. What I’ve come to realize is that while all of these things could help me reach my goals, they do NOTHING if I don’t use them.  Investing in more or different items would be a waste of my money.

Making a shopping list to get fit or lose weight is a stalling tactic. Procrastination. Where is that internal motivation to love myself enough to begin to DO SOMETHING?  I don’t need new gadgets or DVD’s. I need to use what I have on hand and do so consistently. In fact, it’s time to get back to basics.  Remember gym class in high school?  Running and calisthenics?  I’ve decided to start again with walking and some simple floor exercises. Yes. That seems like a good starting point to Move More. I’ll add the other items in as I go.



{May 11, 2012}   Starting Point

We all do it.  We make New Year’s Resolutions, plan to join Weight Watchers next month, promise to join the gym next payday, schedule  to start on that Couch to 5K program on Saturday, etc.  It’s noble, these plans and promises that we make.  We mean well, but the bottom line is…

We procrastinate. We delay. We put it off. We finally start. Life happens. Something gets in the way. We skip a day. We stop. We plan. We procrastinate. It’s a vicious cycle.

Often, we aren’t catapulted into following through or making changes at all, until there is an outside motivator: a family member’s health is in jeopardy, or even our own, motivates a change to be made.  Outside motivators can be helpful, especially the “scary” type.

Honestly, though, to be truly successful and not sabotage our own plans, we must find that internal motivator.  Yes. Self motivation is key.  We all have it. We just don’t use it like we should.  Simply put, it is deciding to…

JUST. DO. SOMETHING!

My external motivator: rapidly deteriorating health and increasing pain.  Diagnosis is irrelevant at this point. I know what needs to change.  My internal motivator: I don’t want to feel like this anymore. I want to feel better and be my “old self”.  I consider myself semi-sedentary in my lifestyle, and at times “inconsistently active”. And my downfall, I love food!  The inconsistency and promises to begin exercising or eating healthier “on Monday” are not helping me.  I have fitness DVD’s, diet books, and exercise stuff. My problem is that I keep wanting things to be perfect and think a fancy program is going to help me. Sure it would, if I actually used it. Waiting for the right day or the beginning of the week or the perfect program is not helping me.  A few days ago, I simply made the decision to “do something”.  I decided to just Eat Well and Move More.  Sounds too simple? No. Not really. It’s a starting point, a realistic starting point.

It doesn’t matter where you decide to begin. Just pick something and do it. And tomorrow, do it again.  Some things should be planned and scheduled, and that’s fine. We shouldn’t wait for June 1st to begin our “programs” or for next Monday to begin to eat better. Each day is a starting point.  Now is a starting point.  Don’t complicate things. Keep it simple.  Eat well. Move more.



et cetera